Welcome to Life on the Verge

Life on the Verge in the Kesteven Uplands and South Lincolnshire Edge....


Life on the Verge Lives on!

Life on the Verge would like to express a huge "Thank you! to all voluntary surveyors who have helped to explore the project area since the summer of 2009. We have been delighted to see two large clusters of wildflower-rich roads emerge from the data. They are situated in the north and centre of the project area and are each contain approximately 50km of road. The course of the old Roman Road, 'Ermine Street' has been found to connect them with the rest of the landscape offering habitat connectivity on a larger scale than we thought possible. Although patchy in quality and mainly poor in condition, the persistent presence of scarce wild flower species indicates a high potential for the restoration of biodiversity.


Go to the Results Page to see what volunteers have achieved and how this newly discovered information is making a difference to conservation management on the ground in Lincolnshire.


Why is limestone grassland important?

With the right management, grassland growing on limestone soils can be one of the most diverse habitats in the country and a riot of wild flower colour in spring and summer. Over 30 species of plant can be found in a square metre of turf.

Both the variety of wild plants and animals it supports and its relative scarcity in Britain and Europe make this a habitat of high conservation value. By conserving limestone grassland, we benefit a whole suite of plants and animals which include nationally threatened species such as dingy skipper, grizzled skipper and Duke of Burgundy butterflies, four-spotted moth, early gentian, pasque flower and commoner species such as glow worms and skylark.

Sadly, there has been a sharp decline in the extent of lowland limestone grassland across the country, particularly in the last 60 years. This has mainly been a result of changes in farming practices.



Click here
to find out what Life on the Verge is doing
in the
Lincolnshire Wolds.